Talk:Are there any advantages to having a slow personal tempo?

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speculation that's not solid enough to belong on main page

1
Mjkurrels (talkcontribs)

Personality traits and LH strategies

Reply to "speculation that's not solid enough to belong on main page"

Slow people anecdotes [feel free to add your stories about slow people here]

4
Mjkurrels (talkcontribs)

I read, talk, walk, write, and wash the dishes slowly. In school, I was usually one of the last people to finish tests.


It took me 8 years to get my undergraduate degree in philosophy, partly because I always took the minimum possible course load (and partly because I loved it there so much). I don't like to be rushed. I think maybe philosophy attracts the slow people. Something about these very difficult, intricate arguments makes for 2 page papers that take 8 hours to read. I could easily spend 30-40 hours writing one 3 page paper.


I've been asking myself for years if there's compensation I get for being slow. I'm still not sure, but I think maybe I'm more patient than most. And maybe the slowness is connected to a certain kind of mental openness or flexibility. Nothing is finished for me. None of my beliefs so firmly held. Everything is about making incremental progress.


This could or could not be related to the slowness, but I seem to be pretty good at knowing when I don't know something. That's what I attributed my successes in school to. I knew when I needed to keep digging, keep asking questions.


I once had a job translating a bit of software from one programming language to another. At the same time three other people translated the code into other programming languages. It was the perfect setup to compare myself to other people and I took about twice as long as the others. My boss gave me the feedback that I was slower than they thought I would be. But on the other hand, I seemed to be more able to find problems in the original program than my faster coworkers. I wasn't hired to find bugs, and I wasn't trying to be careful. I was trying to go as fast as I could. But I think I just approach these kinds of things differently.

Mjkurrels (talkcontribs)

My grandmother told me that she considered herself a "fast" person and her partner a "slow" person. She said that when the two of them would try to solve a problem, they had different approaches. She would consider many possible solutions. But he would pick only a few possible solutions, exploring each one very thoroughly.

Mjkurrels (talkcontribs)

My dad works in construction. He told me that everyone in construction that does "finish work" (that is, work that produces visible results) is slow. That would make sense if slow people are more detail focused and able to get precise results. Whereas work that won't be visible in the final product can tolerably have more mistakes and inaccuracies.

Mjkurrels (talkcontribs)

I've spoken with two people from South America (one Brazilian and one Argentinian). They both say that in their language, calling someone "slow" has the connotation of "stupid," as is the case in English. But interestingly calling someone "fast" also has a negative connotations. A "fast" person is understood to be dishonest.


My guess is that both of these connotations pick up on real (though probably mild) statistical correlations. There is a mild correlation between speed and iq. I wonder if there is any evidence that faster people are less honest than slower people.

Reply to "Slow people anecdotes [feel free to add your stories about slow people here]"
Mjkurrels (talkcontribs)

I think maybe Adam and Jamie from Mythbusters are fast and slow. Would be cool to measure their talking speed and see if their characteristics line up with the work here.

Reply to "Adam and Jamie"
AniaLou (talkcontribs)

I was talking to a friend and she said that "Our ancestors needed fast reaction time to predators and the like but also constantly firing off maybe led to too much adrenaline release and stress so those who had slower times had other benefits that put them at an advantage." I found it interesting and perhaps there could be something there!

Mjkurrels (talkcontribs)

There is a correspondence with less stable environments leading to fast life history strategies. So if fast life history corresponds with faster reaction times and general speed, then your friend may be on to something there.

Reply to "Stress"
AniaLou (talkcontribs)

I deleted the 'relevant question'--I really liked how you reframed it to "comparative advantage of same IQ but different speed". I'll take a look at relevant literature and see what can be surmised.

AniaLou (talkcontribs)

I'm trying to map out a bit the dark area around PS and IQ--there doesn't seem to be a consensus and there are many theories regarding what means to be intelligent in the first place. I don't want to spend too much time there, but at the same time it appears that the deeper we go, the easier it is to find correlations!

AniaLou (talkcontribs)

So I summarized a stackexchange discussion you had pointed out regarding processing speed and IQ and deleted that sentence (kept the link). After reading all that papers on processing speed (and kind of losing perspective), I started thinking that perhaps apart from people having a general speed and some being slow etc, perhaps being slow has to do with the specific way people do things eg. maybe some people have frequent lapses in attention that makes them slow compared to others. Found a paper that correlates walking speed and processing speed (and dementia... unfortunately most research will have to do with extreme cases!). Tomorrow I think it's worth looking into autism and adhd to see if slow processing speed has anything to do with slow movement etc But tell me if you think I'm spending too much time with this intelligence thing. It's just that while it might not be relevant per se, by reading about all these things i get ideas about other ways to explore the subject.

Mjkurrels (talkcontribs)

Ya it's hard to tell if the iq vs processing speed thing is relevant.


I do feel like I saw something about ADD and autistic people having less of a correlation between processing speed and IQ (is that why you put this part in the wiki page "Possible area of study: ADHD and people on the autistic spectrum."?). If that's right (gotta find the source for that) That may be a productive hint for answering this question.


If anything the iq/ps stuff looks like it's to the fast people's advantage, so it would be much more relevant to the question "what advantages do fast people have?". As the question is phrased currently, fast people's advantages might not be so relevant. But at the same time, probably the best way to actually answer this question is to just answer the more general question "what are the differences between fast and slow people." With that approach IQ may be relevant.

Reply to "Processing speed and IQ"
AniaLou (talkcontribs)

I like how in this "I'm still not sure, but I think maybe I'm more patient than most. And maybe the slowness is connected to a certain kind of mental openness or flexibility. Nothing is finished." you tie slowness and patience to a state of mind--a more mindful presence, like your deliberateness allows you to 'hover' over your mind and see it as a whole, as a process, instead of seeing it as a finished product (which would happen when looking at something in a hurry). Some kind of spacetime dilation :))

Reply to "This might not make sense"

I think we should be copying relevant quotes here.

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Mjkurrels (talkcontribs)

AniaLou, Thanks for your work reading and summarizing a bunch of sources recently. On a few cases I found myself wanting to read more, but it took a bit of time to find the places in the articles that you took the information from. If we just copy paste relevant quotes then when we go back to the paper it's easy to just do a ctrl-f search for the quote.

AniaLou (talkcontribs)

Okay, great, will do!

Reply to "I think we should be copying relevant quotes here."

looks like the thing actually has been studied

1
Mjkurrels (talkcontribs)

just dumped a bunch of new sources in the uncategorized sources section and a few of those look like they're directly talking to this question. And I'm pleased to see their results seem to line up with some of our guesses. i'll write more later on this stuff. still plenty that's "open" about this question.

Reply to "looks like the thing actually has been studied"
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